Parrot Week Book Review: Parrots of the World

The color illustrations are crisp and clear as aids to identification. For the most part, the birds are presented on a plain white background, which is a bit boring. They are shown perched naturally on branches. In addition to the standard perched pose, many birds are shown in flight, with both upper- and underparts illustrated. This is done stylishly, with the body of the bird shown with one upper wing and a separate image of the bird's body and under wing. Each color plate presents one to four species.

Some plates seem a bit too busy, showing too many birds together, or having overlapping illustrations. Other plates leave so much white space that it seems that some images may be missing - or that someone forgot to enlarge the images that are there. About a third of the plates have the bird illustrations arranged "just right" to me. This inconsistency isn't really a problem; it's just something I noticed.

The descriptive texts accompany the color plates, which is a big plus. The description for each species is concise and clear, with clearly marked blocks of information. Parrots of similar appearance are mentioned when appropriate, with key identification tips to help distinguish them. Distribution, sub-species (when indicated), and conservation status are also noted for each species. Range maps appear by the descriptions, and they are large and clear.

There is an index of scientific names and a separate index of English names. The English index lists the birds twice, under the family name and again using the entire name. So, for example, the Black Lory appears under B and again under Lory, Black. I really, really like this handy feature.

It's wonderful to have one guide book that has all of the world's parrots in it, and the fine illustrations, informative texts and clear range maps make this book a great addition to any birder's library. I give Parrots of the World 4 Goldfinches out of 5.

Disclosure: This is my own original, honest review of Parrots of the World, a copy of which was provided to me free of charge by the publisher.

Book Review: The Warbler Guide

The species accounts themselves are as in-depth as you'd expect in a quality family-only guide. Photos of full and limited views are accompanied by detailed ID tips, including habitat, foraging technique, behaviors, and more. When plumage...

Book Review: A Supremely Bad Idea

A Supremely Bad Idea: Three Mad Birders and Their Quest to See It All by Luke Dempsey. First published 2008. As reviewed and pictured: softcover, 264 pages. I've been blogging about my birding "adventures" for a few years now. I started this blog way back in late 2005, but...

Giveaway Alert: The Unfeathered Bird

Good Reads is giving away two copies of Katrina van Grouw's The Unfeathered Bird. There is more to a bird than simply feathers. And just because birds evolved from a single flying ancestor doesn't mean they are structurally all the same. With over 385 stunning drawings depicting 200...

Giveaway Alert: Laws Guide to Drawing Birds

Audubon Magazine is giving away 10 copies of The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds by John Muir Laws. To enter and for more information, see the contest blog post. Enter before August 30th.