Book Reviews Revisited

As my birding library grows, I've acquired a lot of books via trading sites like PaperBackSwap (PBS) and BookMooch (BM), or via thrift shops, used book stores, and festival fundraisers. Acquiring books this way makes the obsessive book-collecting part of this hobby a bit more affordable. Publisher review copies help, too! So far I've reviewed 19 books on this blog, most in 2010, and I thought it would be interesting to see where they all came from (and where they are now).

Purchased new or used [2/8 remain in library]:

Received from publisher [6/6 remain in library]:

Received via PaperBackSwap or BookMooch [1/5 remains in library]:

So that leaves 9 of 19 remaining in my library. That's not too bad - it means more room for new books - like the ones Santa brought the other day. :) How do you get your bird books?

Book Review: Nightjars of the World

Nightjars, Potoos, Frogmouths, Oilbird, and Owlet-nightjars of the World by Nigel Cleere. First published 2010. I'm still pretty new at this birding thing, so I'm still enjoying learning about the history of the hobby and of ornithology. The more I read, the more I come to understand everything I...

Book Review: Hawks at a Distance

Hawks at a Distance: Identification of Migrant Raptors by Jerry Liguori. First published 2011. As reviewed and pictured: softcover, 194 pages. As a raptor handler volunteer with FCWR, I got to work up close and personal with several different raptor species. Holding a beautiful bird of prey...

Book Review: Good Birders Don't Wear White

Good Birders Don't Wear White: 50 Tips From North America's Top Birders edited by Pete Dunne. First published 2007. I was reminded to write this short review from a recent Facebook meme, whereby one takes a certain line from a certain page from the nearest book and posts...

Book Review: The Beak of the Finch

The Beak of the Finch by Jonathan Weiner. First published 1994. I'll admit I hadn't heard of The Beak of the Finch when I picked it up at the Unclaimed Baggage shop in Alabama. Arthur had pointed it out to me; he knew I was looking for bird-related...