Book Review: The Warbler Guide

Underview Quick Finder

The species accounts themselves are as in-depth as you'd expect in a quality family-only guide. Photos of full and limited views are accompanied by detailed ID tips, including habitat, foraging technique, behaviors, and more. When plumage differences exist between sexes or ages, they are treated independently -- with distinctive views and comparison species shared per plumage.

The Quiz and Review section at the back of the book is a great way to use the skills and techniques shared in the preceding pages. A couple of additional quick-finder style indexes are also found towards the back of the book: warblers in flight and warblers in silhouette. All of this and much more make The Warbler Guide an outstanding family-only resource for birders looking beyond their general field guide. I give The Warbler Guide 5 Goldfinches out of 5.

Find additional resources on the The Warbler Guide official site. Check out these informative videos on The Warbler Guide, too!

Disclosure: This is my own original, honest review of The Warbler Guide, a copy of which was provided to me free of charge by the publisher.

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